What next for Scotland?

Before the Referendum, politicians promised to devolve more powers to Scotland. Since the vote, a debate’s been raging about what these powers will be and when they’ll come into force.

But so far the debate has centred on politicians. The focus has been on what political leaders in Westminster want to give Scotland, as they play politics with the promises they made during the referendum.

The Smith Commission – set up after the referendum – is meant to deliver new powers to Scotland. Lord Smith says he wants to hear from the public, the Government and political parties. Politicians have been quick off the mark to make their demands and have already had a huge chunk of air time.

Now Smith is calling for ordinary people to email in their views. So let’s make sure that voice of the public is the loudest voice he hears! Together, we could make this the highest number of submissions a Scottish consultation has ever seen.

It will only take 2 minutes. Click here to email in your views now.

Devolution of powers to Scotland should be about what people in Scotland want. So let’s make sure the voices of ordinary people are heard loud and clear above the politicians. We’ve got until the end of October. Let’s make sure for each demand made by the Government, there’s a thousand more from the public.

You don’t need to be a political or legal expert, you just need to tell them what you think – even if that’s simply to keep the promise from the Referendum to give Scotland more power. There’s some tips to help you write your email on the web page.

Here’s a few links where you can read more about devolved powers in Scotland:

  • The Scottish Parliament: Devolved and reserved matters explained
  • The Smith Commission: Guidelines for submission
  • Common Weal: The Key Ideas
  • The Independent: Scottish independence: Cameron, Miliband and Clegg sign devolution ‘vow’ but Scots sceptical
  • Daily Record: Independence referendum: Gordon Brown’s 12-point plan for Scotland
  • Gov.uk Civil Service Leaders Blog: Two weeks is a long time in politics