Have your say on the Brexit deal: The results are in

In the coming weeks, MPs will vote on Brexit. It’s a big decision that will affect a lot of the things we care about: from our NHS, to the food on our plates, how our environment is protected and our immigration rules.

Tens of thousands of us have shared ideas to help decide what 38 Degrees should do. The 38 Degrees staff team has combed through more than 125,000 survey responses, and held video calls with people from across the country to talk about what the next steps could be. Here are the results, and a proposal for what we’ll do next. 

Most of us think 38 Degrees has a big role to play. Lots of us are feeling uncertain about what the different Brexit options could mean, and are worried about what might happen. More than a quarter of us don’t yet know how we think MPs should vote on the deal. We all want to have a clearer sense of exactly how what happens next will affect our lives.

When it comes to the vote in parliament, no option is off the table. So here’s the plan for the next few weeks to get us ready to make the best choice possible when the vote happens:

  • Work with trusted experts to help us understand live developments on the different Brexit options – in a clear, neutral way that’ll cut through the headlines
  • Build easy-to-use tools like snap quizzes to share this information with our friends and family, so as many people as possible can get straight answers about how the Brexit vote will affect our everyday lives
  • Organise get-togethers – online or offline – to have open conversations about Brexit and understand different points of view
  • A fresh 38 Degrees survey when the final deal is agreed with the EU – so we can judge it on what it’ll mean for our lives, not the rumours the papers are reporting

 

At 38 Degrees we don’t make decisions based on a simple majority, because we’re stronger when we find common ground that a large majority of us can get behind. Our diversity of opinions is what makes us an effective movement of millions.

As well as surveying more than 125,000 people online, many 38 Degrees members joined a video call to share their views face to face with the office team. Here’s what they had to say:

“I wouldn’t like to see 38D campaign on party political issues, I think a people’s vote is entirely fair to both leavers and remainers cause it leaves everything on the table. It’d have to have all the options and I think that’d be a great campaign.” – Susan

“It’s very difficult for 38 Degrees because you’ve become the piggy in the middle. There are remainers and brexiteers, and you can’t represent both. Had I wanted you to act on behalf, and I’m a Brexiteer, it means you’re not working on behalf of the remainers. Who do you represent? I don’t know what the worst thing would be.” – Jim

I think you should concentrate on the process – underline that 38D is not on one side or other, just simply wants a democratic process carried out, focus on facts and demand a second referendum.” – Duncan

“If you do anything that takes a position you’re going to annoy half your membership. I think you could take position against false statements – act as fact checker.” – Anonymous

Here are the results in full:

What do you think would be the best result of the Brexit negotiations?

  • 49% of people said the best result would be a public vote.
  • 23% said they would prefer a deal with close ties to the EU, like the deal Norway has
  • 16% said they would prefer a deal with loose ties to the EU, like the deal Canada has
  • 11% think we should leave the EU with no deal
  • 5% of people think 38 Degrees should support the government’s deal, known as the Chequers deal.

What do you think 38 Degrees should do about Brexit in the next few months?

  • 58% of people said 38 Degrees should campaign for a public vote on the deal.
  • 14% said 38 Degrees should provide ways for people to contact the government and MPs, but not pick a side.
  • 11% said 38 Degrees should campaign for a certain type of deal with the EU.
  • 7% said 38 Degrees should stay out of the debate
  • 5% said 38 Degrees should avoid taking a position on the deal, no matter what happens
  • 5% said 38 Degrees should support the current deal to make sure we don’t leave the EU without one

How much of a priority should this be for 38 Degrees?

  • 30% said this should be a top priority – we should drop all other campaigns and focus on this
  • 52% said this should be a high priority – we should keep running other campaigns as well.
  • 11% said this should be a low priority – we shouldn’t prioritise this above other campaigns
  • 7% said this is not a priority at all

What should 38 Degrees definitely not do?

  • 41% said 38 Degrees should definitely not stay out of the debate
  • 23% said 38 degrees should definitely not campaign for a public vote on the deal
  • 12% said 38 Degrees should definitely not campaign for a certain type of deal
  • 10% said 38 Degrees should not avoid taking a position on the deal
  • 9% said 38 Degrees should not support the current deal
  • 5% said 38 Degrees should not provide ways for people to contact the government and their MPs without picking a side.

What’s most important to you about Brexit?

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Should parliament vote the deal through?

We’ve officially started the process of leaving the EU. But the deal that sets the terms we’ll leave on still needs to be agreed. The government is hoping to agree a deal with the EU and put this to a vote in parliament.

If parliament votes through the deal, we’d leave the EU on that basis. The government says it is trying to negotiate a deal with the EU which would mean keeping the same standards as the EU on goods like food, continuing to trade goods with the EU at low cost, no hard border in Northern Ireland, and different immigration rules.

If parliament votes against the deal, it’s uncertain what happens next. It could mean we leave the EU with no deal in March. Lots of experts have warned this could cause difficulties, from price rises in the shops to disruption to the supply of medicine. But some people say that voting down the deal could eventually lead to a different outcome, like a general election, a better deal, or another referendum.

  • 51% said they’d want want parliament to vote the Brexit deal down. I hope this would lead to an outcome I’d like more. I’m happy to take the risk that it could instead lead to an outcome I’d like less
  • 27% said they weren’t sure
  • 22% said they want parliament to vote the Brexit deal through, even if it’s not perfect. The consequences of parliament voting against the deal are too uncertain

 

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If you want to let us know whether you support our Brexit plan, you can answer a few questions here: click here to take the survey